Scandinavian Union

Scandinavian Union

The Scandinavian Union was formed out of economic and military necessity. Ravaged by the Black Tide and Crash of '29, Denmark and Norway were left reeling. Border skirmishes and the threat of invasion from Russia spurred Finland to the negotiating table, while a more stable Sweden sought to have a louder voice in world affairs. The result was a political and economic union based on the late European Union model.

The decision to unify was controversial, and still is. Despite strong efforts from nationalist policlubs and economic isolationists, large protests and even riots, the political leaders of the time pushed forward, citing a need to jointly defend against the Russians, economic recession and megacorporate predation. Ultimately, they were successful, overcoming vastly different economic conditions and ruthless behind-the-scenes deal making - though dearly some member countries got a better part of the deal. Norway in particular, with little to bring to the bargaining table except a desperate - and exploitable - population, has benefited the least from joining the union.

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